I yet again spent the day on 113 yesterday, only in the other direction. It got me to Egware, where I got the staff of Jersey Vogue pretty frustrated because I refused to leave without black fusing fabric.. In the end we came to an agreement, and I left with 4 meters of white fusing instead. I mean, it’s not meant to be visible, and Andreea said it was fine, so I guess it worked out after all. The rest of the day was spent making specs, and I’m still having a debate with myself whether illustrator is a friend or a foe..

I yet again spent the day on 113 yesterday, only in the other direction. It got me to Egware, where I got the staff of Jersey Vogue pretty frustrated because I refused to leave without black fusing fabric.. In the end we came to an agreement, and I left with 4 meters of white fusing instead. I mean, it’s not meant to be visible, and Andreea said it was fine, so I guess it worked out after all. The rest of the day was spent making specs, and I’m still having a debate with myself whether illustrator is a friend or a foe..

Waiting, and waiting, and waiting…

Today, we spent the day mostly waiting for things (hence the title..). We waited for the technician outside the embroidery room for nearly three hours, and when she finally came (from a meeting nobody knew about in the middle of her few office hours - argh!), all we got was some bad news about the time schedule, before we had to run to lasercut where we ‘lasered’ the prints we made on tuesday. I love seeing the laser work, and how things you have only seen on the computer screen suddenly appears in front of you. To be honest, it looked even better when it came out than I first thought, but then again that might just be the relief over everything going smoothly..

After a day full with invasion of personal space at the 113 while running errands, it was  nice spending an entire tuesday in the library doing designs to laser cut. Trying to get a lace design that still fits in with a theme of fetishism turns out to be a full day project but it turned out in the end it can be done. While the occasional chocolate break helped getting through the day, I still felt exhausted at 7, when I finally tumbled out of the library after a 11 hour long day. The project is exciting, and the designs are edgy, yet elegant, which I can’t wait to see the result of after these weeks of work.

After a day full with invasion of personal space at the 113 while running errands, it was  nice spending an entire tuesday in the library doing designs to laser cut. Trying to get a lace design that still fits in with a theme of fetishism turns out to be a full day project but it turned out in the end it can be done. While the occasional chocolate break helped getting through the day, I still felt exhausted at 7, when I finally tumbled out of the library after a 11 hour long day. The project is exciting, and the designs are edgy, yet elegant, which I can’t wait to see the result of after these weeks of work.

You can see a very clear reference from Dolce & Gabbana’s autumn collection from 2011. It’s all in the details: from the modern take on the pompadour, to the short, 50’s style jumpsuits. Even though it’s a very modern take, and it is mixed with a lot of other elements, it is very easy to spot the 50’s in these images. The tiger jacket is a typical example of what Elvis Presley would wear in the mid to late 50’s. Maybe if you take away the tiger print, anyway. The brogues that some of the women are wearing are also very typical. Although most of these look are inspired by the stage life, and not the general picture of what I imagine to be rockabilly, it’s still very time appropriate. Dolce & Gabbana has done a good mix with taken inspiration from both men’s and women’s fashion from the 50’s, and you can clearly see the difference in the garments. it’s almost as if they have made a men’s and women’s collection, both for women.

Marc Jacobs has gone for a very obvious source of inspiration in his a/w 2013 men’s collection. Even though he has been mixing a few different styles, such as marching band trousers and a bit of punks in the footwear. But the overall impression is quite similar to working class 50’s, or what we today associate with rockabilly. It is all very thoroughly done, even the models imitate Elvis’ poses in the pictures, which is a clear reference enough, considering the term ‘rockabilly’ was first used about one of his performances in the 50’s. The college jacket on the model in the last picture screams of Grease, and the low pompadours with clear ‘comb marks’ makes the styling in particular even clearer. The materials used look like they’re both low priced and robust, which was typical in a time when you got clothes that was meant to last a long time. The cut of the burgundy blazer is typical for the time of the transition to leather jackets and the “cool” rockabilly style we see in grease.

Marc Jacobs is known for his own brand with the same name, and also being the creative director for the french design house Louis Vuitton. After studying in the high school of Art and Design, and Parsons The New School for Design, he went on to design his first collection with his own name on it while backed by Onward Kashiyama USA, Inc. He has won a range of awards between 1991-2011. His audience is generally quite young, and he is known for his fresh and happy designs. His fashion shows for Louis Vuitton are often very inventive and different from the standard, white catwalk. He’s changed the way it’s been done with making floral gardens and carousels.

Alexander McQueen’s ss12 men’s wear is as many other designer the last few years inspired by the 50’s. With a mix of punk he’s taken a use of denim and working boots in the same way many would wear it today if they were dressing rockabilly. The typical school jacket indicates inspiration from the early 50’s when rockabilly was still just a term and not quite a lifestyle yet. But as with everything else, the styling is what pulls it all together to a look, and the best indication of a rockabilly inspiration is usually the pompadour hairstyle. However I can picture the look on the right blending perfectly into a 50’s lifestyle. The look on the right has a bit more edge to it, and even though it’s very punk and 70’s with all the safety pins and studs, it was in the 50’s when the movie “the wild one” came out, that the leather jacket-craze really kicked off for the first time.

Alexander McQueen is known for his extravagant and explosive designs. He was not unfamiliar with taking risks in designing, and sometimes ending up with ‘ugly’ designs. In one of his earliest collections after graduating from Central st Martins in London, he introduced the “bum cleavage” that went on to be the talk of the town, but also led to him being offered position as head designer for Givenchy. He turned the brand up side down from the classic french and conservative design, to a more grungy take on it in the 90’s.

Alexander McQueen’s ss12 men’s wear is as many other designer the last few years inspired by the 50’s. With a mix of punk he’s taken a use of denim and working boots in the same way many would wear it today if they were dressing rockabilly. The typical school jacket indicates inspiration from the early 50’s when rockabilly was still just a term and not quite a lifestyle yet. But as with everything else, the styling is what pulls it all together to a look, and the best indication of a rockabilly inspiration is usually the pompadour hairstyle. However I can picture the look on the right blending perfectly into a 50’s lifestyle. The look on the right has a bit more edge to it, and even though it’s very punk and 70’s with all the safety pins and studs, it was in the 50’s when the movie “the wild one” came out, that the leather jacket-craze really kicked off for the first time.

Alexander McQueen is known for his extravagant and explosive designs. He was not unfamiliar with taking risks in designing, and sometimes ending up with ‘ugly’ designs. In one of his earliest collections after graduating from Central st Martins in London, he introduced the “bum cleavage” that went on to be the talk of the town, but also led to him being offered position as head designer for Givenchy. He turned the brand up side down from the classic french and conservative design, to a more grungy take on it in the 90’s.